Monthly Archives: February 2013

BEER HAIKU # 33 Garage Project California Uber Alles

We are still catching up on the new releases here. This brew is from November 2012 and was the Garage Project’s riff off the California Common style made famous by Anchor Steam beer. The Thirsties thought it was a clean tasting beer, slightly spicy or peppery to taste. Here is the haiku…

California Uber Alles (Garage Project)

Hint of honeyed toast

Summer sun shooting the curl

Peppery citrus

The food matches? The thirstyboys would go for tex mex, guacamole, fish taco, or a fresh piece of BBQ’d fish.

This is the type of beer you drink when you are approaching deadmans curve. That’s right…

guacamole from makeitnaked.com

 

hai·ku (hk)

n. pl. haiku also hai·kus

1. A Japanese lyric verse form having three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables, traditionally invoking an aspect of nature or the seasons.

2. A poem written in this form.

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BEER HAIKU #32 Big Red Machine Fall Classic Ale

First blog for 2013, and it’s a bit of catch up on some new releases from the tail end of 2012. On the 20th November, we enjoyed the Big Red Machine Fall Classic Ale (BRMFCA). It’s an American Red Ale from Baird Brewing Company in Japan. The lads found it a bit cloudy looking and probably not what some people would call a red. Not much evidence of hops to the taste, a bit sweet, but neither here nor there. Some comments:

“It has a blackcurrant, syrupy raspberry thing going on” (GBM)

” A bit on the viscous side, it’s got body without being boozy…like a mormon cheerleader” (the jesuit)

The BRMFCA is the type of beer you would have in the States (or Japan) when you are raking leaves or watching gag reels on ESPN. The food match?…apple pie or hot biscuits.

Big Red Machine Fall Classic Ale 6.0%

Too late for baseball
Toffee autumnal berries
Little trace of hops

You can read about the baseball reference here

hai·ku (hk)

n. pl. haiku also hai·kus

1. A Japanese lyric verse form having three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables, traditionally invoking an aspect of nature or the seasons.

2. A poem written in this form.

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