Tag Archives: japanese lyric verse

BEER HAIKU #45 Liberty Bhuty Chocolate Stout

25 June 2013: Something special for the national Chilli Eating Championship, Liberty has produced a superior Chilli Chocolate Stout which earned near unanimous acclamation from Les gars de soif (Thirstyboys in French). Herewith, the haiku…

Liberty Bhuty Chocolate Stout (7% ABV)

After the tempest

Deep chocolate love burns so good*

A whiff of brimstone

Food match: Chilli (obviously), Cheese and pineapple(?) on toast, prawns with lime infused oil, 70% chocolate.

It’s the kind of beer you have when: you need fortification for the storm.

* Middle line courtesy of Sam the Bartender. We are not worthy.

hai·ku (hk)

n. pl. haiku also hai·kus

1. A Japanese lyric verse form having three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables, traditionally invoking an aspect of nature or the seasons.

2. A poem written in this form.

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BEER HAIKU #20 – An Old English Bitter Marmalade by Garage Project

The first of Garage Project’s 24 more was released on Tuesday night at Hashigo zake – cult beer bar. The brewers describe it as “.. .Old English Bitter Marmalade, a proper English session Bitter with a marmalade twist coming in at a modest 3.8% abv, dry hopped and conditioned in the Firkin and served straight from the cask…”And yes, the cask was there sitting on top of the bar Tuesday night! The marmalade had some of us imagining a beer breakfast in the afternoon, and we could have scoffed it down all night. Greasylightbulb was in session beer heaven.

I haven’t heard if the Garage Project’s new releases will come out every Tuesday for the rest of the year, but we are hoping to haiku all 24 of them here eventually…at poetry club.

Moore Wilson’s*, Old English Bitter Marmalade

 by Garage Project (New Zealand) 3.8% abv

C!trus peel sliver

Burnt barley sessionable

Twenty four resumes

*LINK: It was brewed in a supermarket carpark 

click image to go to marmalade recipe

hai·ku (hk)

n. pl. haiku also hai·kus

1. A Japanese lyric verse form having three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables, traditionally invoking an aspect of nature or the seasons.

2. A poem written in this form.

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